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Trapped in the Slow Lane in Placerville

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CA Vehicle Code (CVC) 22348 (c), Speed Laws, or more accurately, “failure to use designated lanes” prohibits the vehicles constrained by CVC 22406Other Speed Laws from driving in any other lanes but the slow lane or the lane closest to the right-hand curb, except for passing. Passing may only be accomplished in the second lane. In many circumstances, drivers call a violation of this code, a “third lane violation.”

Vehicles Subject to CVC 22406

This traffic code applies mostly to trucks, buses, and other vehicles with three or more axles, or vehicles towing another vehicle. Many truckers and bus drivers feel trapped in the slow lane. This is especially true when a driver in the second lane feels compelled to sit in that lane beside a truck or bus and do 55 as well. This maneuver makes it impossible for the truck to move over when merging traffic is entering the highway.

It is illegal and a violation of CVC 21654, Driving on Right Side to ride in a left lane at a rate of speed slower than normal traffic. Left lanes are for passing or overtaking only. Normal traffic does not mean doing the speed limit or below. Most freeways in CA have 65 or 70 mph speed limits, except for the vehicles subject to CVC 22406, who must maintain a 55 mph speed limit. In fact, many trucks have a governor set at 60-62 mph to ensure they do not speed.

Believe it or not, driving the speed limit or slower in a passing lane is more dangerous than speeding. A Wisconsin UniversityTraffic Operations & Safety Laboratory study showed the practice of using the lane for anything other than passing resulted in thousands of more accidents than speeders. Unfortunately, too many law enforcement officers are more focused on truckers.

This type of behavior also leads to road rage and often violent reactions when trapped by drivers, perhaps with a righteous superiority complex who wants to teach other drivers to obey the speed limit by riding in the passing lane at or slightly below the speed limit.

The Unequal Enforcement Dilemma

Trucks and buses are limited to 55 mph, but along US-50 you are liable to witness these vehicles pulled over for speeding while Class C drivers fly by doing 90 or 100 mph. For many, this is the preferred route from Carson City, Nevada to Sacramento and on down to the Bay area and the Oakland Port, one of the largest in the US. However, what many are not ready for are the 55 mph speed limit and the slow lane. Be careful passing through Placerville, it’s no longer “Hangtown,” an early designation given the town after three murderers were hung there on the same day, but you will get ticketed for speeding through this little town of roughly 10,000. The Hangman’s Tree is a CA Historical Landmark.

When coming out of the Eldorado National Forest, you will soon come upon the little community of Placerville and the intersection of US-50 and 49. You are now in El Dorado County about forty miles from Sacramento where I-5, I-80, SR-99 all cross US-50. Placerville is the county seat of El Dorado County and home to the El Dorado County Courthouse.

Consult a CDL Traffic Lawyer that Handles Tickets in Placerville, El Dorado County

Consult with the CDL focused traffic attorney that handles tickets near Placerville, CA call Bigger & Harman (661) 349-9300. Se habla Español (661) 349-9755.

You know as a CDL holder you need experienced and knowledgeable representation to resolve your speeding tickets, designated lane violations, overweight, bad equipment, etc. We are proud to provide that assistance to truckers and bus drivers because we know you cannot take time off to do it yourself. And, because we only handle traffic law cases, we are familiar with the system and how it works in that county.

Send us an email, attorney@biggerharmanlaw.com.

References:

The 2018 CA Commercial Driver Handbook .pdf

CVC 22348 (c), 22406, Speed Laws and 21654, Driving on Right Side

The Wisconsin University Traffic Operations & Safety Laboratory study